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Protesters in Lebanon’s north block roads ahead of new prime minister announcement

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Protesters in Tripoli briefly blocked a central road Monday as parliamentary consultations to choose Lebanon’s next prime minister began.

The protesters used a car and several tires to block a road leading to Sahet al-Nur, the epicenter of recent anti-government protests, local media reported.

Other roads in Tripoli were also blocked by protesters last night, according to a source based in Tripoli.

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Lebanon’s ambassador to Germany Mustapha Adib currently has majority support from lawmakers in the country’s 128-member parliament.

Parliamentary blocs including the Future Movement, Hezbollah and the Progressive Socialist Party, have voted for Adib. The consultations at the Presidential Palace in Baabda are expected to end in the early afternoon after which Adib is likely be appointed as prime minister-designate.

Then he will be tasked with forming a cabinet of ministers, which may take a number of weeks or months.

For now, protesters in Tripoli are not planning any more action. However, this could change abruptly, according to Joudy El-Asmar, a journalist based in Tripoli.

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“These things often happen unpredictability. I guess when [Adib] will be officially nominated we might witness [more widespread protests],” she told Al Arabiya English.

El-Asmar added that people in Tripoli criticize the way in which Adib was nominated.

“In Tripoli those who know [Adib] in person consider he is a good university tutor and well educated. But the way he was nominated was indeed not proper and out of political consensus.”

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